Reid and Colleagues (2001) defined pornography as ‘materials that creates or elicits sexual feelings or thoughts, and contains explicit images or descriptions of sexual acts involving the genitals’. When a considerable time is spent on watching pornographic materials and the entire thought process gets centered on them and it affects studies and other normal functioning, this condition can be termed as addictionAdolescents learn sexual behaviours by observing the sexually explicit material (Alex, Burges & Prentkey, 2009; Haggestrom- Nordin 2006; Haggstrom—Nordian, Tyden, Hanson, Larsson, 2009 and Hunter 2010). They believe these materials might serve as a source of knowledge but most of the time this distorts their images of reality (Huggstrom—Nordin, 2006). Exposure to pornography creates distorted or deviant messages about sexual relationships and sexual behaviours. A serious concern is the impact of pornified culture on adolescents as they at times tend to understand relationships through the lens of this culture. This pornified environment with lack of healthy information affects their vulnerability to victimization and perpetration. Haggstrom—Nordin (2005) has reported that 76% of high school girls watch pornography. Sexual activities in adolescent girls have risks like pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases etc.

Examined exposure to Internet pornography before the age of 18, as reported by college students (n = 563), via an online survey. Ninety-three percent of boys and 62% of girls were exposed to online pornography during adolescence. Exposure prior to age 13 was relatively uncommon. Boys were more likely to be exposed at an earlier age, to see more images, to see more extreme images (e.g., rape, child pornography), and to view pornography more often, while girls reported more involuntary exposure.  Exposure to pornography on the Internet can be described as a normative experience for adolescents. Adolescent girls also now have greater opportunity than ever before to present themselves publicly to a geographically disparate audience. Many young girls choose to display information about their sexuality and sexual lives, such as by indicating their sexual orientations on their SNS profiles, posting stories and poems about sexual desire and experience on blogs, sharing naked or semi-naked pictures and videos of themselves on SNS profiles and via mobile phones (“sexting”), and discussing sexual Reid and Colleagues (2001) defined pornography as ‘materials that creates or elicits sexual feelings or thoughts, and contains explicit images or descriptions of sexual acts involving the genitals’. When a considerable time is spent on watching pornographic materials and the entire thought process gets centered on them and it affects studies and other normal functioning, this condition can be termed as addictionAdolescents learn sexual behaviours by observing the sexually explicit material (Alex, Burges & Prentkey, 2009; Haggestrom- Nordin 2006; Haggstrom—Nordian, Tyden, Hanson, Larsson, 2009 and Hunter 2010). They believe these materials might serve as a source of knowledge but most of the time this distorts their images of reality (Huggstrom—Nordin, 2006). Exposure to pornography creates distorted or deviant messages about sexual relationships and sexual behaviours. A serious concern is the impact of pornified culture on adolescents as they at times tend to understand relationships through the lens of this culture. This pornified environment with lack of healthy information affects their vulnerability to victimization and perpetration. Haggstrom—Nordin (2005) has reported that 76% of high school girls watch pornography. Sexual activities in adolescent girls have risks like pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases etc.

Examined exposure to Internet pornography before the age of 18, as reported by college students (n = 563), via an online survey. Ninety-three percent of boys and 62% of girls were exposed to online pornography during adolescence. Exposure prior to age 13 was relatively uncommon. Boys were more likely to be exposed at an earlier age, to see more images, to see more extreme images (e.g., rape, child pornography), and to view pornography more often, while girls reported more involuntary exposure.  Exposure to pornography on the Internet can be described as a normative experience for adolescents. Adolescent girls also now have greater opportunity than ever before to present themselves publicly to a geographically disparate audience. Many young girls choose to display information about their sexuality and sexual lives, such as by indicating their sexual orientations on their SNS profiles, posting stories and poems about sexual desire and experience on blogs, sharing naked or semi-naked pictures and videos of themselves on SNS profiles and via mobile phones (“sexting”), and discussing sexual