Addiction Treatment Terminology

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Addiction Treatment Terminology

This is a quick guide for terminology specific to addiction recovery.
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[av_iconlist_item title='Cognitive Neural Restructuring Therapy' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']
Cognitive restructuring is a psychotherapeutic process of learning to identify and dispute irrational or maladaptive thoughts. Examples include 'all-or-nothing' thinking (splitting), magical thinking and emotional reasoning, which are commonly associated with many mental health disorders. Cognitive Restructuring (CR) employs many strategies, such as Socratic questioning, thought recording and guided imagery. Additionally CR is used in many types of therapies, including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and Rational Emotive Therapy (RET). A number of studies demonstrate considerable efficacy in using CR-based therapies.
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[av_iconlist_item title='Neural Plasticity' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']
Neuroplasticity, also known as brain plasticity, is an umbrella term that encompasses both synaptic plasticity and non-synaptic plasticity—it refers to changes in neural pathways and synapses. This influences changes in behavior, environment and neural processes, as well as changes resulting from bodily injury. Neuroplasticity has replaced the formerly-held position that the brain is a physiologically static organ, and explores how - and in which ways - the brain changes throughout life.
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[av_iconlist_item title='Dr. Pat Carnes' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']
Patrick Carnes, PhD, is a leading proponent of the viewpoint that some sexual behavior can be seen as an addiction. It was he who put sex addiction on the map. He currently is a Senior Fellow at The Meadows addiction treatment center located in Arizona.
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[av_iconlist_item title='Sobriety' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']
Sobriety is the condition of not having any measurable levels, or effects from mood-altering drugs. According to WHO "Lexicon of alcohol and drug terms...", sobriety is continued abstinence from psychoactive drug use. Sobriety is also considered to be the natural state of a human being at birth. In a treatment setting, sobriety is the achieved goal of independence from consuming or craving mind-altering substances. As such, sustained abstinence is a prerequisite for sobriety. Early in abstinence, residual effects of mind-altering substances can preclude sobriety. These effects are labeled "PAWS", or "post-acute withdrawal syndrome". Someone who abstains, but has a latent desire to resume use, is not considered truly sober. An abstainer may be subconsciously motivated to resume drug use, but for a variety of reasons, abstains (e.g. such as a medical or legal concern precluding use). Sobriety has more specific meanings within specific contexts, such as the culture of Alcoholics Anonymous, other 12 step programs, law enforcement, and some schools of psychology. In some cases, sobriety implies achieving "life balance."
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[av_iconlist_item title='Multiphasic Evaluation' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']
The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) is one of the most frequently used personality tests in mental health. The most recent version, the "MMPI-2RF" was developed by Dr. Auke Tellegen, from the University of Minnesota, and Dr. Yossef Ben-Porath, from Kent State University. The test is used by trained professionals to assist in identifying personality structure and psychopathology.
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[av_iconlist_item title='30 Task Model' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']
The task model is based upon the groundbreaking work and research of Dr. Patrick Carnes. The task model identifies specific therapeutic goals that, if accomplished, will help a patient to establish and maintain sobriety.  This  model is incorporated with Cognitive Neural Restructuring Therapy (CNRT) as a means of helping our patients achieve success and recovery.
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[av_iconlist_item title='Neuro-feedback and Biofeedback' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']
Neurofeedback is a type of biofeedback that measures brain waves or brain blood-flow to produce a signal that can be used as feedback on brain activity to teach self-regulation. Feedback is commonly provided using video or sound, with positive feedback for desired brain activity and negative feedback for brain activity that is undesirable.
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[av_iconlist_item title='12 Step' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']
A twelve-step program is a set of guiding principles (accepted by members as 'spiritual principles,' based on the approved literature).  Twelve-step programs are peer-led, that is, former addicts comprise the leadership of the group.  These groups intend to foster support and strength from each of the group members creating an environment in which sobriety is obtained.
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[av_iconlist_item title='Substance Abuse Disorders' link='' linktarget='' linkelement='' icon='ue81e' font='entypo-fontello']

The American Psychiatric Association has published its criterion for Substance Abuse Disorders in the DSMV.  These can be used as similar criteria for Sexual Addiction/Compulsivity as follows:

  1. Indulging in sexual behaviors in larger amounts or for longer than you intended.
  2. Wanting to cut down or stop doing sexual behaviors but not managing to.
  3. Spending a lot of time getting, using, or recovering from use of the sexual behaviors.
  4. Cravings and urges to act out sexually.
  5. Not managing to do what you should at work, home or school, because of the sexual behaviors.
  6. Continuing to use, even when it causes problems in relationships.
  7. Giving up important social, occupational or recreational activities because of the sexual behaviors.
  8. Using the sexual behaviors again and again, even when it puts the you in danger.
  9. Continuing to use, even when you know you have a physical or psychological problem that could have been caused or made worse by the sexual behaviors.
  10. Needing more of the sexual behaviors, for a longer time, or taking more risks than you want, to get the effect you want (tolerance).
  11. Development of withdrawal symptoms, which can be relieved by doing more of the sexual behaviors.

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